Welcome to the Society for Psychological Anthropology


SPA board at AAA 2016. From left to right: Jason Throop, Cameron Hay-Rollins, Bambi Chapin, Rebecca Lester, Peter Stromberg (back), Elizabeth Carpenter-Song (front), Allen Tran (back), Carol Worthman (front), Tawni Tidwell, Kathy Trang, Edward Lowe, and Jill Korbin. Not pictured: Rebecca Seligman. Photo courtesy of Hal Odden (not pictured).

Anthropology News


Brought to you by Anthropology News co-editors Tawni Tidwell and Kathy Trang. Do you have pictures from the field or any accolades, publications, or news you would like to share with other SPA members? Throughout the year, SPA-AN regularly features research by our members and the team is always looking for ways to better engage with the interests of members. If you have an idea for a piece or for a series, be in touch ([email protected])!

PREVIEW:
Bob Levine on Women’s Education


Around 1980, the first demographic evidence became available suggesting that, in a variety of developing countries, women’s schooling was robustly associated not only with lower fertility but also with reduced (post-infancy) child mortality and increased use of health services. “Robust” in this context means that the associations did not disappear when income, father’s schooling, and “socioeconomic status,” however measured, were statistically controlled. (The associations of women’s schooling with infant mortality did disappear when income and father’s schooling were controlled, indicating that the death of infants was more dependent on domestic economic resources than that of older children.) Results from the World Fertility Survey during the 1980s confirmed the original findings, so that by 1988 it was clear that sending girls to school could generate a major demographic transition to lower birth and death rates. But the mechanism or processes involved remained mysterious.

Look for the full edition next month!

Rick Shweder on 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award


Byron Good and I have known each other for fifty years. So there was something seamless, intimate, affectionate and even life-affirming about our SPA breakfast conversation in which we interviewed each other about our biographies, intellectual passions and perspectives on the future of psychological anthropology. And there was a noticeable complementarity in our academic careers and self-described biographies—he, Mennonite farm boy from Illinois and once a graduate student at the University of Chicago who went on to become a faculty member at Harvard and I, secular Jewish kid from New York City and once a graduate student at Harvard who went on to become a faculty member at the University of Chicago.

The SPA dinner the next night took on the shape of an academy awards presentation, or at least it was introduced that way by Carol Worthman, the SPA President. Upon being presented with a Life Time Achievement award, I couldn’t resist just following her cue.

Read more…

Byron Good on 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award


In accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award from Carol Worthman, I said that receiving her note telling me about the Board’s decision ranked with the invitation to deliver the Morgan Lectures many years ago as one of the two most memorable moments of my career. Given those who have received this award in psychological anthropology, this recognition by my colleagues was unexpected, and is deeply meaningful.
As Rick Shweder mentions in Anthropology News, the Friday morning conversation at the biennial was a lovely opportunity to ask each other about how our personal lives have influenced our approaches to this field. How, I asked Rick, did his own history lead him to his convictions about moral pluralism, which appear in his earliest work. What special role does he see psychological anthropology playing in the development of cultural psychology? And what is his vision for an anthropology not only of moral personhood but of subjectivity across cultures?

Read more…

Placeholder

Summary

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Pellentesque pretium, nisi ut volutpat mollis, leo risus interdum arcu, eget facilisis quam felis id mauris.

Highlights

  • Feature One
  • Feature Two
  • Feature Three

Placeholder
Placeholder

Summary

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Pellentesque pretium, nisi ut volutpat mollis, leo risus interdum arcu, eget facilisis quam felis id mauris.

Highlights

  • Feature One
  • Feature Two
  • Feature Three

Voices of Experience

Dr. Hinton discusses his research among genocide survivors in Cambodia since the 1990s. Between 1975 and 1979, approximately two million Cambodians were killed during the Khmer Rouge. Dr. Hinton’s work has employed anthropological methods to illuminate why such atrocities occur and what justice means in the aftermath of genocide and mass violence. Focusing on the 2009 trial of Duch, a Khmer Rouge torturer, Hinton explores in his recent book (Man or Monster?: The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer) the differences between global discourses of human rights and local conceptualizations of justice, and the impact of this disparity on Khmer Rouge survivors.

In this conversation, Dr. Thein-Lemelson discusses her research on the Burmese democracy movement and the atrocities that were perpetrated against activists and civilians during the 1988 Uprising and in its aftermath. Her research has examined historical memory of the uprising and the psychosocial, political, cultural, relational, and structural determinants of resilience among previously imprisoned political leaders, as well as factors that contributed to the long-term resilience of the democracy movement as a whole.

An interview and conversation with Dr. Rebecca Lester as part of the SPA Voices of Experience series. In this conversation, Dr. Lester discusses her newest book project “Famished: Eating Disorders in the Era of Managed Care” focusing on the conditions and experience of eating disorders treatment in the United States.

An interview and conversation with Drs. Greg Downey (Macquarie University) and Daniel Lende (University of South Florida). In this conversation, Drs. Downey and Lende discuss the origin, applications, and future directions of neuroanthropology and the growth of its associated platforms online.

Recent Prize Winners


Placeholder

Condon Prize for Best Student Essay in Psychological Anthropology: Amir Hampel



Living Buddhism

Stirling Prize for Best Book in Psychological Anthropology: Julia Cassaniti


Boyer Prize for Contributions to Psychoanalytic Anthropology: Aaron Denham